ElderCarelink Blog

Creating a more meaningful visit when a person has memory loss

by Kathryn Kilpatrick, M.A. CCC/SLP
February 18th, 2011 at 5:04 am

Communicating effectively with a person who is becoming more forgetful often requires some patience and a willingness to try a few different strategies. The more relaxed they are, the less frustrated or agitated they will become. When you try some of these suggestions, you can frequently make a significant difference in the time that you spend together.

Read more »

Creating time well spent across the miles

by Kathryn Kilpatrick, M.A. CCC/SLP
February 11th, 2011 at 5:48 am

Many adult children and grandchildren of older adults do not live near one another. When an older adult is less able to travel or communicate, keeping the connection going may take some special planning.

Read more »

“Ten Glorious Seconds” tender and real

by Carol Bursack
February 11th, 2011 at 3:06 am

Many of us who have loved someone with dementia have experienced what I call “moments of clarity,” during which the person who seems lost to dementia suddenly “comes back,” if only for a few seconds. I experienced several of these episodes with my dad, who had dementia due to a failed brain surgery, and they remain some of my most precious memories.

Read more »

CMS “Ask Medicare” site helpful

by Carol Bursack
February 8th, 2011 at 3:07 am

Is this covered by Medicare?

Questions about Medicare coverage come my way daily. Generally, the question is about in-home agency care, assisted living or nursing home care. I can give people a general idea of what Medicare may or may not cover, but Medicare and/or Medicaid coverage depends on many variables, sometimes including which state you live in. Therefore, for information beyond the extremely general, I must direct people to the Medicare site.

Read more »

How do your elders view new technology that monitors their home life?

by Carol Bursack
January 18th, 2011 at 3:12 am

During my busiest elder care years, I convinced several of my elders to wear personal medial alarms. With personal medical alarms, the person wearing the alarm is in control. If there’s a fall or other emergency, the person pushes a button on the bracelet or necklace style alarm, and help is summoned. Once they agreed to wear the devices, my elders did feel more peace of mind.

Read more »