ElderCarelink Blog

Slow medicine, decision-making may lead to better care for seniors

by Dorian Martin
November 30th, 2011 at 10:40 am

Slow down! That message is one we need to hear when it comes to making decisions on health matters for the elderly. In this era of text messages, snap decisions and time limits on doctor’s visits, it really may be beneficial to give elders, caregivers and doctors some time to think about next steps and to make informed decisions.

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Tennessee basketball coach Pat Summitt launches Alzheimer’s foundation

by Carol Bursack
November 29th, 2011 at 10:35 am

Hall of Fame basketball coach Pat Summitt has found a way to put the perfect spin on National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month. She, along with her son Tyler, has created a foundation that will provide grants to nonprofit organizations that research Alzheimer’s. In August, Summitt was diagnosed with early onset dementia of the Alzheimer’s type. Summitt has vowed to continue coaching, both because she wants to keep doing what she loves, and because she is passionate about demonstrating to others that life isn’t over when a dementia diagnosis is received.

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Is it time to take over an elder’s finances?

by Judy Kirkwood
November 28th, 2011 at 10:05 am

My neighbor, a single mother with an active 5-year-old and a stressful job, is trying to help her 70-something mother with her financial problems. But there is no financial solution. Her mother is obviously unable to handle her financial affairs.

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Alzheimer’s and humor therapy: laughter as medicine

by Carol Bursack
November 22nd, 2011 at 2:12 pm

Although Norman Cousins made a case for laughter being the best medicine, there hasn’t been a lot of research published on how humor can affect a person with Alzheimer’s disease. A recent study brings us the welcome news that using humor to interact with our elders may improve their health. The study–conducted in Australia–found that “humor therapy” appears as effective as psychiatric drugs for people with Alzheimer’s disease.

The study revealed that nursing home residents who participated in two-hour “clowning-sessions,” which included mime, music and more, displayed a reduction in verbally and physically aggressive behavior. Even more surprising is this drop in agitated behavior lasted for over three months after humor therapy ended.

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“Villages” provide support for elders to remain at home

by Dorian Martin
November 17th, 2011 at 11:49 am

Many years ago, the familiar catch phrase going around was, “It takes a village to raise a child.” Now there’s a new way to think about this phrase. While in-home care is commonly used to help elders remain in their homes, a new movement is currently afoot to create villages of support for elders who want to remain in their homes.

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